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Michigan

Referred to Committee on Regulatory Reform:  The Bank of Michigan Act, Deposits, Accounting, Allowing the deposit of State money in the Bank of Michigan:

January 23, 2018  Michigan lawmakers file bi-partisan bill to create a State Public Bank  http://www.publicbankinginstitute.org/michigan_lawmakers_file_bi_partisan_bill_to_create_a_state_public_bank    Michigan leaps forward into the running for the first state in a hundred years to create a state Public Bank, thanks to Republicans and Democrats working together for their state's best interests.

Last Thursday, MI House Bills 5431-5434 were formally introduced a bipartisan package of bills that would create and maintain a state bank. According to a statement by State Rep. Martin Howrylak (…

 


6:30 Wednesday, March 21
Democratic Headquarters*


Who's your favorite?

          Delaine Eastin?  Gavin Newsom?  John Chiang?  Antonio Villaraigosa?

Let's discuss the Democratic candidates in this important election.

*740 Front Street, Suite 165 - groundfloor of the Galleria

 

A proposed initiative for California's November ballot would make a big change to Proposition 13, the landmark Constitutional amendment approved by the state's voters in 1978, limiting property taxes to 1 percent of a property's market value at the time it was purchased and capping annual increases at 2 percent, regardless of how much a property's value goes up. The new ballot initiative would establish a "split-roll" property tax system, allowing the state to assess commercial and industrial property at their current market value, while keeping the Prop. 13 limits in place for residential property.

According to a report from the state's nonpartisan Legislative Analyst's Office, the change would generate $6 billion to $10 billion more in property tax revenue for the sta…

 

February 26, 2018

Present  - Sandra Nichols, Franco Piccarella, Nancy Krusoe, Nancy Abbey, Judy Geer, Gail Jack, Kendon Smith, and Eve Majure.

We agreed to support a Reversing Runaway Inequality workshop on May 5 at the RCNV. The Executive Committee made a donation of $100, recommended that there be a $10 fee for the workshop, and considered  a possible $100 more in the future if it's needed to cover costs.  Kendon will go to the DCC for their support and participation.

We are looking for people to take over some of the tasks that support the PDC.

  • Write and send email notifications to members.
  • Monitor the website to keep it current
  • Post articles to the website
  •  Kendon will prepare sign-in sheets for meetings.

The fundraising committee reported th…

by Les Leopold (from Huffington Post/CommonDreams.org)


Hillary Clinton underperformed Barack Obama by minus 290,000 votes in Pennsylvania, minus 222,000 votes in Wisconsin and a whopping minus 500,000 votes in Michigan. We don't know how many of these voters also supported Sanders along they way, but it is highly likely that millions took that journey. Winning them back is the key to the battle for economic and social justice.

Rounding up the usual suspects?

The current resistance to Trump is truly remarkable. Not since the anti-Vietnam War and Civil Rights protests have we seen so many people in the streets ? women, Muslim ban protesters, scientists protesting in behalf of facts, people just protesting ? with more to come. Even three New England Patriots are refusing to …

America is the richest country in all of history. We have the largest economy and the largest number of millionaires and billionaires. At the same time, however, we lead the developed world in economic inequality. In 1965, CEOs received $20 for every dollar earned by the average worker. Today the gap is $354 to $1.

In the 1960s, Lyndon Johnson declared a war on poverty. We lost the war. Today, of all the developed nations in the world, America is near the top when it comes to the percentage of our children living in poverty.

We lead the developed world in homelessness:
One of the most crushing outcomes of runaway inequality is homelessness. According to the National Coalition for the Homeless, homelessness has multiple causes including foreclosures, poverty, decline of work opportunities, reductions in public assistance, lack of affordable health care, mental illness, addiction and domestic violence. Many of these causes are directly related to and exacerbated by rising inequality.

As the wealthy deploy tax shelters both here and abroad, the money for affordable housing, urban shelters and public assistance has declined. Gentrification of urban areas has further driven up housing costs and pushed low-income residents from single room hotels, boarding houses and shelters. The housing crash, …

We can find data that compares our country to others when it comes to student debt. That's because in most countries higher education is free. In fact, higher education once was virtually free here as well. After WWII, the GI Bill of Rights paid for more than 3 million veterans to return to school, tuition free. The bill also provided stipends for living costs as well. California and then New York also developed tuition-free state wide university systems. However, as runaway inequality set in, state and federal support for higher education did not keep up with tuition costs. The breach was filled by Wall Street, which profits mightily from the trillion dollar student debt market.

Our vision is so crippled by rising inequality that we consider student d…


For much of American history, the incarceration rate was relatively low and steady, even during the turbulent 1960s. But as rising inequality took hold around 1980, so did the rise of our prison population.

Runaway inequality and the downward pressure on wages, especially for those at the bottom, create ideal conditions for a vast underground economy. Stiff sentencing laws and the War on Drugs colluded to fill our prison's and jails. For-profit private prison companies with Wall Street financing have pressed to keep the jails full and to expand them.




Runaway inequality gives the richest of the rich the nerve to deploy tax loopholes to reduce their taxes. They also have the power to subvert democracy by preventing politicians from eliminating these enormous giveaways. The most egregious example, the "carried interest" loophole, allows billionaire hedge funds and private equity managers to avoid billions in taxes that the rest of us, of course, have to make up. By allowing these billionaires to declare ordinary income as capital gains, this loophole drops their top rate drops from 39.6%, to 20%. We're talking big money.

Here's how it plays out. The top 25 hedge fund managers in 2013 collectively took in $24.3 billion dollars. For starters, that gives them an average income of $467,000 an hour. They…

Runaway inequality gives the richest of the rich the nerve to deploy tax loopholes to reduce their taxes. They also have the power to subvert democracy by preventing politicians from eliminating these enormous giveaways. The most egregious example, the "carried interest" loophole, allows billionaire hedge funds and private equity managers to avoid billions in taxes that the rest of us, of course, have to make up. By allowing these billionaires to declare ordinary income as capital gains, this loophole drops their top rate drops from 39.6%, to 20%. We're talking big money.

Here's how it plays out. The top 25 hedge fund managers in 2013 collectively took in $24.3 billion dollars. For starters, that gives them an average income of $467,000 an hour. They…



A society scarred by runaway inequality will divide in to two very unequal sectors.

For the super-rich, the world of for-hire private services will cater to their every need. They live on patrolled estates, commute by helicopter, travel by private jet, educate their children in elite private schools, receive high quality private health care, and be treated differentially by politicians as well as the criminal justice system. They are hermetically sealed from homelessness and crime. Student debt is a non-issue except as a financial market to exploit. Poverty and fair taxes are far, far away from their day to day realities.

When your are the richest of the rich, America looks damn good. Your employees and servants fawn over your. Politicians and the medi…

By David C. Bohnett


California voters have an opportunity this November to correct decades-old legislation that has resulted in deteriorated public institutions and services throughout our state. It's time to challenge the divisive and widespread anti-tax sentiment promulgated by powerful interest groups bankrolled by wealthy donors.

The California Schools and Local Communities Funding Act is a proposed constitutional amendment that would update and improve Proposition 13, the 1978 tax law that fundamentally crippled local governments.

A contributing factor to Prop. 13's passage was the sentiment that older Californians should not be priced out of their homes through high property taxes. However, the proposition's underreported giveaways to big business and corporations have …



Saturday, March 17th, 9:45-4pm


Cabrillo College Horticulture Building 


Free admission (donations welcome); $10 lunch by India Joze ?free for Cabrillo students


Register online: 
https://www.eventbrite.com/e/transportation-justice-conference-tickets-42824616581


The public is invited to attend this conference on transportation strategies that could narrow social inequality in our community. 

See below for conference schedule and workshop descriptions.

Conference Schedule

9:15am coffee & snacks

9:45am  Social Equity with the Advent of Automated Vehicles
Elizabeth Deakin, UC Berkeley Professor Emerita of City and Regional Planning
Director, UC Transportation Research Center, 1998-2008

11:15am Advocating for Safe Bicycling and Walking
Cathy DeLuca, Policy and Program Director, Walk S…

"Moreover, as Proposition 13 controls the taxation of commercial property as well as residential property, the regime greatly favors the commercial enterprises of the [wealthiest], placing new businesses at a substantial disadvantage." Supreme Court Justice John Stevens in dissent on Nordlinger v. Hahn (1992).

 

Isn't Prop. 13 just for homeowners?

No.  Most voters are unaware of this, but Prop. 13 applies to commercial property as well.  This aspect of the law has led to significant unintended consequences.  For example, Chevron alone is saving over $100 million a year by benefiting from Prop. 13's protections. Because homeowners move on average every ten years, and commercial property rarely, if ever, changes hands, the tax burden in California has shifted de…

"Moreover, as Proposition 13 controls the taxation of commercial property as well as residential property, the regime greatly favors the commercial enterprises of the [wealthiest], placing new businesses at a substantial disadvantage." Supreme Court Justice John Stevens in dissent on Nordlinger v. Hahn (1992).

 

Isn't Prop. 13 just for homeowners?

No.  Most voters are unaware of this, but Prop. 13 applies to commercial property as well.  This aspect of the law has led to significant unintended consequences.  For example, Chevron alone is saving over $100 million a year by benefiting from Prop. 13's protections. Because homeowners move on average every ten years, and commercial property rarely, if ever, changes hands, the tax burden in California has shifted de…

One of the most crushing outcomes of runaway inequality is homelessness. According to the National Coalition for the Homeless, homelessness has multiple causes including foreclosures, poverty, decline of work opportunities, reductions in public assistance, lack of affordable health care, mental illness, addiction and domestic violence. Many of these causes are directly related to and exacerbated by rising inequality.

As the wealthy deploy tax shelters both here and abroad, the money for affordable housing, urban shelters and public assistance has declined. Gentrification of urban areas has further driven up housing costs and pushed low-income residents from single room hotels, boarding houses and shelters. The housing crash, brought to us by Wall Street, dislocated m…


Runaway inequality gives the richest of the rich the nerve to deploy tax loopholes to reduce their taxes. They also have the power to subvert democracy by preventing politicians from eliminating these enormous giveaways. The most egregious example, the "carried interest" loophole, allows billionaire hedge funds and private equity managers to avoid billions in taxes that the rest of us, of course, have to make up. By allowing these billionaires to declare ordinary income as capital gains, this loophole drops their top rate drops from 39.6%, to 20%. We're talking big money.

Here's how it plays out. The top 25 hedge fund managers in 2013 collectively took in $24.3 billion dollars. For starters, that gives them an average income of $467,000 an hour. They…

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